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The six tasks of leadership

Saw a tweet today detailing Tim Brighouse's 'Six Tasks of Leadership'. I really enjoy Tim's work and his approach so it was no surprise that I agreed that the six tasks he prioritised were all important. However, my own six would be slightly different, so I thought I would offer them here as a stimulus for everyone to consider their own top six tasks.

Mine are: 1) Be values driven
               2) Recognise the importance of, and build, relationships
               3) Lead learning, not instruction
               4) Support and be actively involved in professional development that is school based and a     continuous process
               5) Develop teacher agency, adaptive expertise and dispersed leadership
               6) Measure everything in terms of impact for learners

It is not easy to select your top six tasks of school leadership, but it's a useful exercise to help you identify your own drivers.

What are yours?
              

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